1838
1929
1975
1985
1986

1838

Great Western Railways opened the new line nearby serviced by the station at West Drayton. A branch line to Uxbridge was not built until 1904.

1929

Heathrow Airport started operations as a small airfield on land southeast of the hamlet of Heathrow, from which the airport takes its name.

1975

A bronze age axe was found nearby where there are also clues suggesting that a burial ground and settlement were established close to Stockley Park.

1985

Archaeological excavations revealed bronze and iron age structures consisting of four circular huts and associated granaries.

1986

The vision to create a leading business park near Heathrow Airport became reality. Stockley Park began development, created by some of the world’s leading architects and designers.

A rich heritage dating back 250,000 years

The site of today’s Stockley Park masks a heritage that is rich in archaeological discovery dating back some 250,000 years. Throughout its history the area has witnessed the evolution of mankind and the way man has learned to adapt local resources to the best advantage. Before the last ice age, Palaeolithic man and woman crafted primitive stone tools which were swept into the gravel underneath Stockley by the rivers and melting glacier waters. Neanderthal man visited the site 70,000 years ago and the implements found in the nearby Yiewsley gravel pits reflected slow, yet definite progress over the centuries in the evolution of these nomadic hunters and gatherers.

Overtime their sharpened flint tool kits became more efficient at feeding, clothing and sheltering themselves. Proof of this was discovered at Yiewsley gravel pits, which were investigated early this century, when some of the most extensive deposits in this country of the tools knapped by Neanderthal man were found.

history-image

In 1975 a bronze age axe was found near Harlington Church and nearby there are clues suggesting that a burial ground and settlement were established close to Stockley at the time. Certainly during the middle iron age there was at least one farming community harvesting wheat, barley and oats from the fertile ground.

Archaeological excavations in 1985 and 1990 have also revealed four circular huts and associated granaries, along with weaving equipment and the first evidence of industrial waste, metal slag.